Word of the Day – 15 Nov 2011 – Syzygy


*******Ummm…this word looks like someone just started randomly pressing keys on a keyboard. ;)*******
A.Word.A.Day

with Anu Garg

syzygy

PRONUNCIATION:
(SIZ-uh-jee) 
MEANING:
noun:
1. An alignment of three objects, for example, sun, moon, and earth during an eclipse.
2. A pair of related things.
From Latin syzygia, from Greek syzygia (union, pair). Ultimately from the Indo-European root yeug- (to join), which is also the ancestor of junction, yoke, yoga, adjust, juxtapose, rejoinder, jugular, and junta. Earliest documented use: 1656.
NOTES:
One could hyperpolysyllabically contrive a longer word having four Ys, but syzygy nicely lines up three of them organically in just six letters.
USAGE:
“‘To me it’s two dots that connect,’ Douglas Coupland says, ‘I don’t know if there’s going to be a third one so it makes a syzygy.'”
John Barber; Douglas Coupland; The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada); Oct 2, 2009.

Explore “syzygy” in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:

If Galileo had said in verse that the world moved, the inquisition might have let him alone. –Thomas Hardy, novelist and poet (1840-1928)

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