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  • Mother Shyra 18:21 on 31 October 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: chintzy, clothing, , wordsmith   

    Word of the Day – 31 Oct 2011- Chintzy 


    chintzy

     

    PRONUNCIATION:
    (CHINT-see) 

     

    MEANING:
    adjective:
    1. Decorated with chintz.
    2. Cheap; gaudy; inferior.
    3. Stingy.

     

    ETYMOLOGY:
    From chintz, a printed cotton fabric imported from India, from Hindi chheent (spattering, stain). Earliest documented use: 1851.

     

    USAGE:
    “Mohammed Al Fayed may have turned the once chintzy department store into a successful luxury brand.”
    Jan Moir; Sphinxes. A Diana Shrine. Piles of Tat; Daily Mail (London, UK); May 15, 2010.

    “I wasn’t going to spend a nickel on anything else, so it treated me like any chintzy customer.”
    Frank Gray; For $14.95, Get a Knife, Hard Time; The Journal Gazette (Fort Wayne, Indiana); Aug 19, 2010.

    Explore “chintzy” in the Visual Thesaurus. 

    A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:

    It was my shame, and now it is my boast, That I have loved you rather more than most. -Hilaire Belloc, writer and poet (1870-1953) 

    Wordsmith.org

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  • Mother Shyra 12:28 on 27 October 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: beginner's luck, , , , , wordsmith   

    Word of the Day – 27 Oct 2011 


    beginner’s luck

     

    PRONUNCIATION:
    (bi-GIN-uhrs luk) 

     

    MEANING:
    noun: The initial good fortune supposedly enjoyed by a novice in a game or another activity.

     

    ETYMOLOGY:
    The counterintuitive phenomenon of a novice having success in an activity has been called beginner’s luck. It may simply be confirmation bias: one remembers hits, but ignores misses. Earliest documented use: 1897.

     

    USAGE:
    “Rookie paddlers will then see if they can dial into beginner’s luck, and win a race while they’re at it.”
    Patrick Witwicki; Rainbow Warriors Challenge Paddlers; Muskeg News (Canada); May 25, 2011.

     

    A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:

    The secret of good writing is to say an old thing in a new way or a new thing in an old way. -Richard Harding Davis, journalist and author (1864-1916)

    Wordsmith.org

     


     
  • Mother Shyra 13:19 on 26 October 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , dogsbody, menial, , , wordsmith, worker   

    Word of the Day – 26 Oct 2011 – Dogsbody 


    dogsbody

     

    PRONUNCIATION:
    (DOGZ-bod-ee) 

     

    MEANING:
    noun: A menial worker; drudge.

     

    ETYMOLOGY:
    In the British navy, dogsbody was the term sailors used for the unpalatable food given to them, boiled peas (officially known as pease pudding) and biscuits soaked in water. With time the term began to be applied to low-ranked sailors and eventually to anyone who is forced to do menial jobs that no one else wants to do. Why a dog? Probably from the general poor reputation of a dog, as evident in terms such as a dog’s life and a dog’s chance. Earliest documented use: 1818.

     

    USAGE:
    “The US has been accused of treating Britain not as a partner but as a dogsbody.”
    Nick Amies; Obama Visits Britain; Deutsche Welle (Bonn, Germany); May 24, 2011.

    Explore “dogsbody” in the Visual Thesaurus. 

    A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:

    Whenever a man has cast a longing eye on offices, a rottenness begins in his conduct. -Thomas Jefferson, third US president, architect and author (1743-1826) 

    Wordsmith.org

     
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